Gentoo Archives: gentoo-science

From: "M. Edward (Ed) Borasky" <znmeb@×××××××.net>
To: gentoo-science@l.g.o
Subject: Re: [gentoo-science] Re: New category proposal - sci-vis
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2005 01:02:01
Message-Id: 438A56DF.3030904@cesmail.net
In Reply to: [gentoo-science] Re: New category proposal - sci-vis by Donnie Berkholz
Donnie Berkholz wrote:

> Macromolecular graphics tools I really consider biochemistry, so they > can go either way. But I more often hear biochemistry elongated as > biological chemistry than chemical biology. So if forced to categorize > one or the other, I lean toward chemistry.
It all depends on the size of the molecules and the amount of specialization of the researchers, I think. We could go to the extreme of a category for each package if we were perverse enough. :) I'm just starting to explore the Bioconductor Project (http://www.bioconductor.org). When all is said and done, Bioconductor, though it's primarly a collection of R code for cancer and genetics research, is really applied math and computer science. For example, I'm using some of the routines in Bioconductor for computer performance engineering. Of course, my father was a biochemist and the correspondences between computer science, computational biochemistry and genetics were not lost on me. In short, my vote is for biology or biocomputing or bioinformatics rather than biochemistry or chemistry. Just on the off chance some of you are interested in the heavy stuff, the good folks in Seattle at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center are having an advanced R programming class in January. I've already spoken to the organizers and they've assured me that the course is more about R than bioinformatics and that computer scientists like myself are welcome. If I go I will be bringing a Gentoo laptop, of course. :) For more details, visit https://cobra.fhcrc.org/rforbioc/ -- M. Edward (Ed) Borasky http://linuxcapacityplanning.com -- gentoo-science@g.o mailing list