Gentoo Archives: gentoo-doc-cvs

From: Jan Kundrat <jkt@××××××××××××.org>
To: gentoo-doc-cvs@l.g.o
Subject: [gentoo-doc-cvs] cvs commit: power-management-guide.xml
Date: Mon, 21 Jan 2008 12:15:59
Message-Id: E1JGvZE-00021r-FV@stork.gentoo.org
1 jkt 08/01/21 12:15:56
2
3 Modified: power-management-guide.xml
4 Log:
5 whitespace stuff and line wrapping, *no content change*
6
7 Revision Changes Path
8 1.34 xml/htdocs/doc/en/power-management-guide.xml
9
10 file : http://sources.gentoo.org/viewcvs.py/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/power-management-guide.xml?rev=1.34&view=markup
11 plain: http://sources.gentoo.org/viewcvs.py/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/power-management-guide.xml?rev=1.34&content-type=text/plain
12 diff : http://sources.gentoo.org/viewcvs.py/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/power-management-guide.xml?r1=1.33&r2=1.34
13
14 Index: power-management-guide.xml
15 ===================================================================
16 RCS file: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/power-management-guide.xml,v
17 retrieving revision 1.33
18 retrieving revision 1.34
19 diff -u -r1.33 -r1.34
20 --- power-management-guide.xml 21 Jan 2008 12:12:12 -0000 1.33
21 +++ power-management-guide.xml 21 Jan 2008 12:15:56 -0000 1.34
22 @@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
23 <?xml version='1.0' encoding="UTF-8"?>
24 <!DOCTYPE guide SYSTEM "/dtd/guide.dtd">
25 -<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/power-management-guide.xml,v 1.33 2008/01/21 12:12:12 jkt Exp $ -->
26 +<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/power-management-guide.xml,v 1.34 2008/01/21 12:15:56 jkt Exp $ -->
27 <guide link="/doc/en/power-management-guide.xml">
28 <title>Power Management Guide</title>
29
30 @@ -155,9 +155,8 @@
31 <p>
32 There are different kernel sources in Portage. I'd recommend using
33 <c>gentoo-sources</c> or <c>tuxonice-sources</c>. The latter contains patches
34 -for TuxOnIce, see the chapter about <uri link="#doc_chap7">sleep
35 -states</uri> for more details. When configuring the kernel, activate at least
36 -these options:
37 +for TuxOnIce, see the chapter about <uri link="#doc_chap7">sleep states</uri>
38 +for more details. When configuring the kernel, activate at least these options:
39 </p>
40
41 <pre caption="Minimum kernel setup for Power Management (Kernel 2.6)">
42 @@ -1406,8 +1405,8 @@
43 </pre>
44
45 <p>
46 -The following section discusses the setup of TuxOnIce including fbsplash
47 -support for a nice graphical progress bar during suspend and resume.
48 +The following section discusses the setup of TuxOnIce including fbsplash support
49 +for a nice graphical progress bar during suspend and resume.
50 </p>
51
52 <p>
53 @@ -1416,8 +1415,8 @@
54 config, you have to pass it as a kernel parameter with the
55 <c>resume=swap:/dev/SWAP</c> directive. If booting is not possible due to a
56 broken image, append the <c>noresume</c> parameter. Additionally, the
57 -<c>hibernate-cleanup</c> init script invalidates TuxOnIce images during the
58 -boot process.
59 +<c>hibernate-cleanup</c> init script invalidates TuxOnIce images during the boot
60 +process.
61 </p>
62
63 <pre caption="Invalidating TuxOnIce images during the boot process">
64 @@ -1438,9 +1437,8 @@
65
66 <p>
67 Please configure <c>fbsplash</c> now if you didn't do already. To enable
68 -fbsplash support during hibernation, the <c>sys-apps/tuxonice-userui</c>
69 -package is needed. Additionally, you've got to enable the <c>fbsplash</c> USE
70 -flag.
71 +fbsplash support during hibernation, the <c>sys-apps/tuxonice-userui</c> package
72 +is needed. Additionally, you've got to enable the <c>fbsplash</c> USE flag.
73 </p>
74
75 <pre caption="Installing tuxonice-userui">
76 @@ -1511,15 +1509,14 @@
77 <p>
78 <e>A:</e> Make sure your processor supports CPU frequency scaling and you chose
79 the right CPUFreq driver for your processor. Here is a list of processors that
80 -are supported by cpufreq (kernel 2.6.7): ARM Integrator, ARM-SA1100,
81 -ARM-SA1110, AMD Elan - SC400, SC410, AMD mobile K6-2+, AMD mobile K6-3+, AMD
82 -mobile Duron, AMD mobile Athlon, AMD Opteron, AMD Athlon 64, Cyrix Media GXm,
83 -Intel mobile PIII and Intel mobile PIII-M on certain chipsets, Intel Pentium 4,
84 -Intel Xeon, Intel Pentium M (Centrino), National Semiconductors Geode GX,
85 -Transmeta Crusoe, VIA Cyrix 3 / C3, UltraSPARC-III, SuperH SH-3, SH-4, several
86 -"PowerBook" and "iBook2" and various processors on some ACPI 2.0-compatible
87 -systems (only if "ACPI Processor Performance States" are available to the
88 -ACPI/BIOS interface).
89 +are supported by cpufreq (kernel 2.6.7): ARM Integrator, ARM-SA1100, ARM-SA1110,
90 +AMD Elan - SC400, SC410, AMD mobile K6-2+, AMD mobile K6-3+, AMD mobile Duron,
91 +AMD mobile Athlon, AMD Opteron, AMD Athlon 64, Cyrix Media GXm, Intel mobile
92 +PIII and Intel mobile PIII-M on certain chipsets, Intel Pentium 4, Intel Xeon,
93 +Intel Pentium M (Centrino), National Semiconductors Geode GX, Transmeta Crusoe,
94 +VIA Cyrix 3 / C3, UltraSPARC-III, SuperH SH-3, SH-4, several "PowerBook" and
95 +"iBook2" and various processors on some ACPI 2.0-compatible systems (only if
96 +"ACPI Processor Performance States" are available to the ACPI/BIOS interface).
97 </p>
98
99 <p>
100 @@ -1542,8 +1539,7 @@
101 <e>A:</e> Probably you have activated symmetric multiprocessing support
102 (CONFIG_SMP) in your kernel. Deactivate it and it should work. Some older
103 kernels had a bug causing this. In that case, run <c>emerge x86info</c>, update
104 -your kernel as asked and check the current frequency with
105 -<c>x86info -mhz</c>.
106 +your kernel as asked and check the current frequency with <c>x86info -mhz</c>.
107 </p>
108
109 <p>
110 @@ -1553,11 +1549,11 @@
111
112 <p>
113 <e>A:</e> You can combine frequency scaling with ACPI throttling to get a lower
114 -minimum frequency. Notice that throttling doesn't save much energy and is
115 -mainly used for thermal management (keeping your laptop cool and quiet). You
116 -can read the current throttling state with <c>cat
117 -/proc/acpi/processor/CPU/throttling</c> and change it with <c>echo -n "0:x" >
118 -/proc/acpi/processor/CPU/limit</c>, where x is one of the Tx states listed in
119 +minimum frequency. Notice that throttling doesn't save much energy and is mainly
120 +used for thermal management (keeping your laptop cool and quiet). You can read
121 +the current throttling state with <c>cat /proc/acpi/processor/CPU/throttling</c>
122 +and change it with <c>echo -n "0:x" > /proc/acpi/processor/CPU/limit</c>, where
123 +x is one of the Tx states listed in
124 <path>/proc/acpi/processor/CPU/throttling</path>.
125 </p>
126
127 @@ -1633,8 +1629,8 @@
128
129 <p>
130 <e>A:</e> If there is enough free space on your system, you can use the
131 -filewriter instead of the swapwriter. The <c>hibernate-script</c> supports it
132 -as well. More information can be found in
133 +filewriter instead of the swapwriter. The <c>hibernate-script</c> supports it as
134 +well. More information can be found in
135 <path>/usr/src/linux/Documentation/power/tuxonice.txt</path>.
136 </p>
137
138
139
140
141 --
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