Gentoo Archives: gentoo-user

From: Mick <michaelkintzios@×××××.com>
To: gentoo-user@l.g.o
Subject: Re: [gentoo-user] Question regarding dual boot accessibility...
Date: Mon, 26 Feb 2007 19:44:47
Message-Id: 200702261935.42549.michaelkintzios@gmail.com
In Reply to: Re: [gentoo-user] Question regarding dual boot accessibility... by Alan McKinnon
1 On Monday 26 February 2007 19:18, Alan McKinnon wrote:
2 > On Monday 26 February 2007, Chris wrote:
3 > > Hello,
4 > >
5 > > I have a dual boot windows / Gentoo system. I have my NTFS (windows)
6 > > main partition listed in fstab with "user,noauto,nosuid, noatime". A
7 > > normal user can mount and umount it, but cannot change directories,
8 > > look at files, etc. as they'll get a permission denied error. When I
9 > > list the files and dirs, they all show up as belonging to
10 > > "root:root", with no access for group and others.
11 > >
12 > > My question is: Is there a way to allow normal users to at least
13 > > read these files and change dirs, short of chown and/or chmod on the
14 > > NTFS partition?
15 >
16 > ntfs does not understand unix permissions, so there is no concept of a
17 > unix owner and group. You use the uid and gid options to fudge one -
18 > normally root:root is ok.
19 >
20 > Then to set permissions, use the umask option. 0555 should be OK -
21 > read/execute for all. It must be 5 otherwise you can't cd into a
22 > directory.
23 >
24 > Actually you want fmask and dmask options like as in vfat, but mount -t
25 > ntfs doesn't support that, so you have to make do with umask.
26
27 Whilst you're at it you may want to consider ntfs-3g which can also write to
28 ntfs:
29
30 http://packages.gentoo.org/search/?sstring=ntfs3g
31
32 I haven't had any corruption or failures so far (keeps fingers crossed) but I
33 am not sure that I would trust a production environment to it. You mileage
34 may vary.
35 --
36 Regards,
37 Mick